KAREN FROSTIG SYLLABI
ART AND VISUAL INQUIRY

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Art is about understanding “who we are” at this juncture in history. Art embodies human expression,
symbolic reasoning, interpretation and analysis. It is about seeing and knowing, questioning and imagining.
Art is about the artist, the object, the audience and the innovative processes that bring these elements into
dialogic discourse.

Students will be immersed in a variety of art-based investigations, promoting criticality and social agency.
Implications for curriculum development will also be addressed.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

* To examine changing theoretical constructions of art.

* To know art first hand, through the making and viewing, asking questions, posing solutions,
searching within the medium itself.

* To further artistic exploration and skill development in the visual arts, increasing familiarity and
confidence in working with a variety of materials.

* To explore the dynamic interplay of art and culture, identity and politics, arriving at a vibrant and
compelling synthesis regarding art as: idea, expression experience, and social consciousness.

* To consider elements of modernist design in a postmodern environment where hybridization of
ideas prevail.

* To bridge the divide between the classroom as “insular laboratory” and the classroom as a
“permeable arena” to develop fresh ideas with real world currency.

SELECTED TEXTS

art:21: Art in the twenty-first century. from www.pbs.org/art21/

Barrett, T. (2008). Why Is That Art? New York: Oxford University Press.

Bee, S., & Schor, M. (Eds.). (2000). Meaning: An anthology of artists' writings, theory, and criticism.
Durham: Duke University Press.

Berger, J. (1972). Ways of Seeing. New York: Penguin Books.

Danto, A. C. (1997). After the End of Art: Contemporary Art and the Pale of History.
Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Duncum, P., & Bracey, T. (Eds.). (2001). On Knowing: Art and visual culture. Christchurch, N.Z.:
Canterbury University Press

Efland, A., Freedman, K., & Stuhr, P. (1996). Postmodern Art Education: An approach to curriculum.
Reston, Virginia: The National Art Education Association.

Freeland, C. (2001). But Is It Art?: An Introduction to Art Theory. New York: Oxford University Press, Inc.

Frostig, K. “The Permeable Classroom or the Tilted Arc Revisited” Journal of Social Theory in Art Education.
26.1 (2006): 176-194.

Gude, O. (2004). “Postmodern Principles: In search of a 21st century art education.” Art Education:
The Journal of the National Art Education Association,
57(1), 6-14.

Housen, A. (2004). What is Visual Thinking Strategy? Visual understanding in education, Part One,
from www.vue.org/whatisvts.html

Jeffers, C. S. (2000). “Drawing on Semiotics: Inscribing a place between formalism and contextualism.”
Art Education: The Journal of the National Art Education Association,
53(6), 40-45.

Lippard, L. (1990). Mixed Blessings: New art in a multicultural America. New York: Pantheon.

Lupton, E. (2004). Thinking with Type: A critical guide for designers, writers, editors and students. New York:
Princeton Architecture Press.

Miles, M. (Ed.). (2005). New Practices--New Pedagogies: A reader. New York: Routledge.

Nollert, A. (2002). “Realities of the Artistic Imagination.” In O. Enwezor (Ed.), Documenta 11_Platform 5:
Exhibition (Vol. 11, pp. 123-128). Kassel: Hatje Cantz Publishers.

Palmer, P. J. (1998). The Courage to Teach. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

Robertson, J., & McDaniel, C. (2005). Themes of Contemporary Art: Visual art after 1980. New York:
Oxford University Press.

Staniszewski, M. A. (1995). Believing is Seeing. New York: Penguin Books.

Walker, S. (2003). “What More Can You Ask? Artmaking and inquiry.” Art Education: The Journal of the
National Art Education Association,
56(5), 6-12.

Warburton, N. (2003). The Art Question. New York: Routledge.

Weintraub, L. (1997). Art on the Edge and Over: Searching for art's meaning in contemporary society
1970s-1990s.
New York: Art Insights.

Weintraub, L. (2003). In the Making: Creative options for contemporary art. New York: d.a.p., Art Publishers.

Young, J. O. (2001). Art and Knowledge. New York: Routledge.

 
PUBLIC ART IN PUBLIC SPACES go to top of page

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Departing from traditional forms of sculpture, the post-studio, public works artist embraces a participatory,
site-specific conceptualization of public space that is aligned with contemporary movements, such as Fluxus,
earthworks and performance art. Migrating from a position of detachment to a position of engagement, pubic
artists “activate” public spaces, engaging the viewer in novel encounters as participatory players. Through
case study development, students will be challenged to think imaginatively and critically about the changing
role of artists in contemporary culture.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

* To examine historical and critical perspectives of 21st century artistic practice.

* To differentiate “plop art,” art that is purely decorative and self-referential, to public works that grow out of civic
dialog and a sense of place.

* To investigate notions of public space, real and virtual and local and global, and to explore different modes of
artistic engagement in the public realm.

SELECTED TEXTS

Armour, E. T. (1998). Deconstruction, Feminist Theology, and the Problem of Difference. Chicago: The University of
Chicago Press.

Bendau, M. (1996). Mierle Laderman Ukeles [videorecording]. South Burlington: Vt: Annenberg/CPB Collection.

Bogdanov, B. (1994). Public Interventions [videorecording]. Boston, MA: The Institute of Contemporary Art.

Bogdanov, B. (1995). Rachel Whiteread [videorecording]. Boston, MA: Institute of Contemporary Art.

Bogdanov, B. (1998). Bunker Hill Monument Projection [videorecording]. Boston, MA: Institute of Contemporary Art.

Chandler, A., & Neumark, N. (Eds.). (2005). At a Distance: Precursors to Art and Activism on the Internet.
Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Dissanayake, E. (1988). What is Art For? Seattle: University of Washington Press.

Enwezor, O. (2002). “The Black Box.” In O. Enwezor (Ed.), Documenta11_Platform5: Exhibition (Vol. 11, pp. 42-55).
Kassel: Hatje Cantz Publishers.

Felshin, N. (Ed.). (1995). But Is It Art? The Spirit of Art as Activism. Seattle: Bay Press.

Friedman, K. (Ed.). (1998). The Fluxus Reader. London: Academy Editions.

Frostig, K., & Halamka, K. A. (Eds.). (2007). Blaze: Discourse on Art, Women and Feminism. Newcastle, UK:
Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Gablik, S. (1991). The Reenchantment of Art. New York: Thames and Hudson, Inc.

Gablik, S. (1995). Conversations Before the End of Time: Dialogues on Art, Life & Spiritual Renewal.
New York: Thames and Hudson, Inc.

Garcia-Ferraz, N., Horsfield, K., & Miller, B. (1987). Ana Mendieta: Fuego de Tierra [videorecording].
New York: Videocassette. Women Make Movies..

Guerilla Girls Broad Band. from www.ggbb.org/

Kester, G. H. (Ed.). (1998). Art, Activism, and Oppositionality. Durham: Duke University Press.

Lacy, S. (Ed.). (1995). Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art. Seattle: Bay Press.

Lippard, L. (1984). Get the Message?: A Decade of Art for Social Change. New York: E.P. Dutton.

Lippard, L. R. (1997). The Lure of the Local. New York: The New Press.

Lovejoy, M. (2004). Digital Currents: Art in the Electronic Age. New York: Routledge.

Mock, F. L. (1994). Maya Lin [videorecording]: A Strong Clear Vision. Santa Monica: CA: Sanders & Mock
Productions/Ocean Releasing.

Raven, A. (1998). Crossing Over: Feminism and Art of Social Concern. Ann Arbor: UMI.

Riedelsheimer, T. (2001). Rivers and Tides: Andy Goldsworthy Working with Time [videorecording].
Germany: Deutscher Kamerapreis.

Saltzman, L. (2006). Making Memory Matter. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Sayre, H. (1989). The Object of Performance. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Senie, H. F. (2002). The Tilted Arc Controversy: Dangerous precedent? Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Usherwood, P. (2004). Public Art and Collective Amnesia. In J. Harris (Ed.), Art, Money, Parties (pp. 115-132).
Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

Wang, D. S. (2003). Practice in Critical Times. Art Journal, 62(2), 68-81.

 
DRAWING go to top of page


COURSE DESCRIPTION

Drawing is a way of seeing, thinking, feeling, planning and being in the moment. Both a means and an end, it is
a direct embodiment of visual processes, a way to investigate, interpret and respond to the world around us.
Considered central as well as marginal, drawing is often understood to be the basis for all art.

Drawings act as sites for investigation, deepening the artist’s relationship between subject matter, materials and
personal expression. Students move back and forth between observation and conceptualization, intention and
reflection, while exploring ideas about line, space, gesture, rhythm, direction and time. Traditional or “formal”
materials, such as pencil, charcoal, inks, easel or verticality, are used alongside non-traditional or “subversive”
materials, such as sticks, wire, mud, grease, shadow, tape, folded line, tar, string, or tablet and stylus pen.

The physical or digital mark serves as a trace, a record of perceptual thinking, creating while interrogating
meaning. Voice, place and idea are cultivated as integral aspects of the process.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

* To examine the question: “What is drawing?”

* To broaden ideas about the tools of drawing; experiment with different surfaces and contexts.

* To locate individual artistic practice within a critical and chronological history of artistic production.

* To investigate the boundary between drawing, painting, sculpture, and photography.

SELECTED TEXTS

Butler, C. H. (1999). Afterimage: Drawing Through Process. Cambridge, The MIT Press.

 
DEVELOPING NARRATIVES THROUGH RITUAL go to top of page

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is designed to explore the nature of ceremony and the development of liminal space
as a key element of Performance Art and Installation Art. Ceremony and ritual have a long history
rooted in an array of cultural and religious traditions. This course will examine ceremony and ritual
as personalized expression directed at objects, sites, events, and transitions, identified by students
as “significant” moments in need of commemoration. Students will work individually as well as in small
groups, alternately as creators, viewers and participants.

Ceremonies will be conceptualized as hybrid events incorporating visual art, text, sound, and kinesthetic
elements in an effort to develop symbolic reenactment of an event, a story, or an idea. Through discussion,
we will consider personal, social, spiritual, and political frames of reference in developing ideas and
evaluating processes.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

* To survey different strategies of narration, memorialization and ritualization.

* To develop innovative methods of communication and commemoration concerning events or ideas occurring
in the personal or public realm.

* To investigate different points of reference (i.e. personal history, current events, cultural events, the media,
science, biology, globalization, and the passage of time) while developing fresh, interdisciplinary moments of
engagement and reflection.

* To explore ceremony and ritual as vehicles of magic, mystery and meaning.

SELECTED TEXTS

Anderson, L. (1991). Empty Places: A Performance. New York: HarperCollins Publishers.

Blocker, J. (1999). Where Is Ana Mendieta? Durham: Duke University Press.

Blumenthal, L., & Horsfield, K. (1980). Joseph Beuys [videorecording]. Chicago: Video Data Bank.

Gablik, S. (1991). The Reenchantment of Art. New York, Thames and Hudson, Inc.

Heartney, E., Posner, H., Princenthal, N., & Scott, S. (2007). After the Revolution: Women Who Transformed
Contemporary Art.
New York: Prestel.

Kwon, M. (2002). One Place After Another. Cambridge, The MIT Press.

Mirzoeff, N. (Ed.). (1999). Diaspora and Visual Culture: Representing Africans and Jews. New York: Routledge.

Rogoff, I. (2000). Terra Infirma: Geography's Visual Culture. New York: Routledge.

Saltzman, L. (2006). Making Memory Matter. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Sayre, H. (1989). The Object of Performance. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press.

Wodicsko, K. (1999). Critical Vehicles: Writings, Projects, Interviews. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

 
ARTS ACTIVISM go to top of page


COURSE DESCRIPTION

Students are introduced to a range of contemporary artistic practices that bridge agency with activism. The
instrumental nature of artistic activity is conceptualized in relation to the history of arts activism and the culture
of dissent, alongside diverse strategies of intervention. Place, moment, memory, motion and sound are interrogated
as sites of meaning and points of engagement.

Students will be asked to identify a specific issue, conflict or situation that warrants further attention. Relying on
interdisciplinary models of investigation, students will develop a pilot project over the course of a semester, that
demonstrates new learning regarding the nature of arts activism.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

* To investigate ideas about arts activism, inventing innovative, arts-based interventions that foster social engagement
and civic dialogue.

* To introduce students to different theoretical structures that support an interdisciplinary approach to activist work.

* To build bridges into the community, using qualitative research methodologies to evaluate community needs and design
project proposals that include insider voices.

* To gain an understanding of collaborative models and participatory practices in relation to activist pilot project
development.

* To learn about social media as a means of facilitating in-class and out-of-class, collaborative project development.

* To deepen students’ understanding of difference, injustice and despair on a large scale, while striving to find a common
language of hope, based in activist models of inclusion.

SELECTED TEXTS

art:21: Art in the Twenty-First Century. from www.pbs.org/art21/

EYEBEAM. Retrieved March 1, 2008, from http://www.eyebeam.org/

Guerilla Girls Broad Band. from www.ggbb.org/

Aagerstoun, M. J., & Auther, E. (2007). Special Issue: Feminist Activist Art. NWSA Journal: A Publication of the National
Women's Studies Association,
19(1).

Allara, P., Martin, M., & Mtshiza, Z. (2003). Coexistence: Contemporary Cultural Production in South Africa, Waltham, MA.
Appadurai, A. (2006). Fear of Small Numbers: An Essay on the Geography of Anger. Durham: Duke University Press.

Asher, R. (2009). Radical Puppets and the Language of Art. Art Education: The Jounal of the National Art Education
Association,
62(3), 6-12.

Ballengee-Morris, C., & Stuhr, P. L. (2001). Multicultural Art and Visual Cultural Education in a Changing World. Art Education:
The Journal of the National Art Education Association, 54(4), 6-13.

Banks, M. (2007). Using Visual Data in Qualitative Research. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

Barrett, T. (2003). Interpreting Visual Culture. Art Education: The Journal of the National Art Education Association, 56(2), 6-12.

Berman, K., & Allara, P. (2008). Transformational Practices in Community Learning: A South African Case Study. The International
Journal of Learning,
14(8), 113-124.

Bermudez, J. L., & Gardner, S. (Eds.). (2003). Art and Morality. New York: Routledge.

Boal, A. (1979). Theare of the Oppressed. New York: Theater Communications Group.

Boal, A. (2002). Games for Actors and Non-Actors, 2nd Edition. New York: Routledge.

Bradley, W., & Esche, C. (Eds.). (2007). Art and Social Change: A Critical Reader. London: Tate Publishing in Association
with Afterall.

Campbell, M. S., & Martin, R. (Eds.). (2006). Artistic Citizenship: A Public voice for the arts. New York: Routledge.

Chandler, A., & Neumark, N. (Eds.). (2005). At a Distance: Precursors to Art and Activism on the Internet. Cambridge, MA:
The MIT Press.

Felshin, N. (Ed.). (1995). But Is It Art? The Spirit of Art as Activism. Seattle: Bay Press.

Friedman, K. (Ed.). (1998). The Fluxus Reader. London: Academy Editions.

Frieling, R., Groys, B., Atkins, R., & Manovich, L. (2008). The Art of Participation. London: Thames & Hudson.

Frostig, K. (2009). Transnational Dialogues Dealing with Holocaust Legacies. In E. Delacruz, A. Arnold, A. Kuo & M. Parsons (Eds.), G.L.O.B.A.L.I.Z.A.T.I.O.N., Art and Education. Reston, VA: National Art Education.

Frostig, K. (2006). The Permeable Classroom or the Tilted Arc Revisited. Journal of Social Theory in Art Education, 26(1), 176-194.

Frostig, K., & Halamka, K. A. (Eds.). (2007). Blaze: Discourse on Art, Women and Feminism. Newcastle, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Gregory, D., & Pred, A. (Eds.). (2006). Violent Geographies: Fear, Terror and Political Violence. New York: Routledge.

Griffin, S. (1978). Woman and Nature: The Roaring Inside Her. New York: Harper.

Groys, B. (2008). Art Power. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Hyde, L. (1999). Trickster Makes This World. Berkeley: Northpoint Press.

Jaggar, A. M. (1983). Feminist Politics & Human Nature. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.

Kester, G. H. (Ed.). (1998). Art, Activism, and Oppositionality. Durham: Duke University Press.

Kovaks, C. (Ed.). (2008). Montage 2008: In the Crosshairs: Intersections of Art and War. Iowa City: The University of Iowa.

Krauss, R., Michelson, A., Baker, G., Bois, Y.-A., Buchloh, B. H. D., Dickerman, L., et al. (2008). In what ways have artists,
academics, and cultural institutions responded to the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq? October, 123(Winter 2008), 3-241.

Kwon, M. (2002). One Place After Another. Cambridge: The MIT Press.

Lacy, S. (Ed.). (1995). Mapping the Terrain: New Genre Public Art. Seattle: Bay Press.

LaShure, C. (2005). What is Liminality? Retrieved 22 June 2009, from http://www.liminality.org/about/whatisliminality/

Lawson, E. T. (2001). Psychological Perspective on Agency. In J. Andresen (Ed.), Religion in Mind: Cognitive perspective on
religious belief, ritual and experience
(pp. 141-172). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lippard, L. (1984). Get the Message?:A Decade of Art for Social Change. New York: E.P. Dutton.

Lippard, L. R. (1997).The Lure of the Local. New York: The New Press.

Lorde, A. (1984). Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches. Freedom, CA: The Crossing Press.

Matzner, F. (Ed.). (2003 [2001]). Public Art: A reader. Germany: Hatje Cantz Publishers.

Minnich, E. K. (1990). Transforming Knowledge. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Mitchell, W. J. T. (Ed.). (1992). Art and the Public Sphere. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Naidus, B. (2009). Arts for Change: Teaching Outside the Frame. Oakland, CA: New Village Press.

Odysseos, L. (2007). The Subject of Coexistence; Otherness in International Relations. Minnesota: University of Minnesota Press.

Raunig, G. (2007). Art and Revolution: Transversal Activism in the Long Twentieth Century (A. Derieg, Trans.). Cambridge, MA:
The MIT Press.

Raven, A. (1998). Crossing Over: Feminism and Art of Social Concern. Ann Arbor: UMI.

Rogoff, I. (2000). Terra Infirma: Geography's Visual Culture. New York: Routledge.

Rothman, J. (1997). Resolving Identity-Based Conflict in Nations, Organizations, and Communities. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Saltzman, L. (2006). Making Memory Matter. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Sayre, H. (1989). The Object of Performance. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Senie, H. F. (2002). The Tilted Arc Controversy: Dangerous precedent? Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Short, J. R. (2001). Global Dimensions: Space, Place, and the Contemporary World. London, UK: Reaktion Books.

Stimpson, B., & Sholette, G. (Eds.). (2007). Collectivism after Modernism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Smith, K. (2007). The Guerilla Art Kit. New York: Princeton Architectural Press.

Sollins, S. (Ed.). (2001). art:21: Art in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers.

Sontag, S. (2003). Regarding the Pain of Others. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Spaeth, C. (2009). New York City Art Tours Blog. from http://www.catherinespaeth.com/blog/

Stanczak, G. C. (2007). Visual Research Methods: Image, Society, and Representation. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

Thompson, N., Kastner, J., & Paglen, T. (2008). Experimental Geography: Radical Approaches to Landscape, Cartography,
and Urbanism.
New York: Melville House Publishing.

Walker, A. (1988). Living by the Word. New York: A Harvest Book.

Walkowitz, D. J., & Knauer, L. M. (Eds.). (2004). Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Space. Durham: Duke University Press.

Wodiczko, K. (1999). Critical Vehicles: Writings, Projects, Interviews. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Young, J. E. (2002). At Memory's Edge: After-Images of the Holocaust in Contemporary Art and Architecture. New Haven:
Yale University Press.

 
 
 
 
© 2007. Karen Frostig.    Tel: (617) 965 6274   Fax: (617) 964 7654   E-mail: karen.frostig@gmail.com